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Chapter 4

CURRICULUM

4.6 CONCESSIONS AND ACCOMMODATIONS

4.6.1Legislative and Policy Framework

ACTS

  • The National Education Policy Act, 1996 (Act No. 27 of 1996) [NEPA]
  • The South African Schools Act, No. 84 of 1996 [SASA]

 

REGULATIONS

  • Regulations Pertaining to the Conduct, Administration and Management of the National Senior Certificate Examination (Aug 2008) (Government Gazette No. 31337) and as amended by Regulation Notice No. 371 in Government Gazette No. 37651, dated 16 May 2014 [NR NSC]

 

POLICIES     

  • Policy on the Screening, Identification, Assessment and Support as published in Government Gazette No. 38356 of 19 December 2014 [SIAS]
  • National Policy Pertaining to the Conduct, Administration and Management of the National Senior Certificate Examination published as Government Gazette No 30048 of 6 July 2007 and amended as Government Notices 372 and 373 in Government Gazette, Vol. 587, No 37652 dated 16 May 2014; Annexure C1 – Assessment for Learners who Experience Barriers to Learning and Assessment [NSC]
  • National Policy Pertaining to the Programme and Promotion Requirements of the National Curriculum Statement Grades R-12 (Government Gazette No. 34600 of 12 September 2011 as amended by Government Notices No.1496 and 1497 in Government Gazette, No. 40472 dated 2 December 2016) [NPPPR]
  • Amended Conduct Policy Annexure on Accommodations, Government Gazette, No. 37652, 16 May 2014 [NP 37652/2014]
  • National Protocol for Assessment Grades R – 12, Government Notices No. 722 and No. 723, Government Gazette No. 34600 of 12 September 2011 and amended as: Government Notice No. 1115 and No. 1116, Government Gazette No. 36042 of 28 December 2012 [NPA]

 

GUIDELINES

  • Guidelines for Responding to Learner Diversity through the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statements [NG DCA]

4.6.2Framework for the Development of School Policy on Concessions and Accommodations

  1. What are accommodations?
    Accommodations cover a range of differentiated strategies that can be implemented to minimise the impact of a barrier to learning on the assessment of a learner. These strategies may include giving a learner extra time during tests and examinations, enlarge print, providing a reader or a scribe, allow for rest breaks, etc. These mechanisms are described in Annexure C1 – Assessment for Learners who Experience Barriers to Learning and Assessment.
  2. What are concessions?
    Concessions are measures aimed at minimising the impact of a barrier to learning on the assessment of the learner and to place such learners on par with other learners and let them perform to full potential.
    There are two categories of concessions, those relating to the position of an immigrant learner and those relating to barriers that impact on a learner’s learning.
  3. Concessions for Grades R to 12
    • Concessions for immigrants
      • According to the NPPPR, an immigrant learner is a child or dependent of a diplomatic representative of a foreign government accredited in South Africa, or a person who first entered a South African school in Gr 7 or a higher grade, or started his/her schooling in South Africa and attended school in another country for two or more consecutive years after Gr 3 or its equivalent and has subsequently returned to South Africa.
      • The learner must be in possession of the relevant documents from the Department of Home Affairs, and proof must be issued by the school where the learner for the first time entered the South African school system.
      • An immigrant learner in Gr 1-9 is required to offer the two official languages, one on Home Language Level and one on First Additional Language Level.
      • An immigrant learner in the Intermediate and Senior Phase must pass one of the required two official languages on at least First Additional Language Level and obtain a rating of Moderate Achievement (Level 3) in that Language, and must further comply with all the other Intermediate and Senior Phase promotion requirements.
      • An immigrant learner in the Intermediate and Senior Phase may offer his or her home language in lieu of one official language, provided that it is an officially approved non-official language.
      • An immigrant learner in Gr 10-12 may offer only one official language on at least First Additional Language Level and obtain a rating of 30% in that language, provided that another subject from Group B of the subject offerings is offered in lieu of the other official language,
      • An immigrant may also offer his/her home language in lieu of that one official language instead of a subject from Group B, subject to his/her home language being on the list of languages on home language level in Table B4 of the subject offerings as outlined in the NPPPR. If it is not, the candidate may offer his/her home language on the A-level of the GCE of the UK, or as a subject examined in an examination recognised by the Department of Basic Education.
    • Concessions for learners with other barriers to learning (neurological, sensory, physical etc)
      • In the Intermediate and Senior Phase, a Deaf learner must offer the two required official languages, one at Home Language Level, the other at First Additional Language Level, but they need only achieve a 3 rating in one of the two on First Additional Language Level and a 2 in the other also on FAL level.
      • The same applies for learners with communication and language impairments, such as aphasia and dyslexia.
      • A Deaf learner in Grades 10-12 who do not offer South African Sign Language at Home Language Level may offer one official language at First Additional Language Level which is the language of learning and teaching, provided that another subject from Group B is offered in lieu of the one official language that is not offered.
      • Learners in Grades 10-12 with communication and language impairments such as aphasia or dyslectic candidates may offer only one official language at First Additional Language Level if another subject from Group B in the NPPPR is offered in lieu of the other language.
      • Candidates in Gr 10-12 suffering from a mathematical disorder such as dyscalculia, may be exempted from offering Mathematical Literacy or Mathematics, if another subject from Group B (see NPPPR) is offered in lieu of this subject.
  4. Processing of concessions and accommodations
    • All applications must be directed to the head of the provincial education department immediately after the disorder has been diagnosed.
    • All applications must be accompanied by an evaluation conducted by LSEN structures and by external, professionally registered experts in the relevant field.

4.6.3Guidelines for the Development of School Policy on Concessions

  • Schools could include the guidelines and protocol as outlined in the SIAS policy as well as Annexure C1 – Assessment for Learners who Experience Barriers to Learning, in their own school policy.
  • Primary and high schools should consult the websites of their provincial department and determine whether there are provincial guidelines additional to the SIAS protocol on concessions and accommodations.